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Alice Caporn’s Hollywood Juice Cocktails c.1930s

  • Carrot juice – Magnetises the blood stream, good for hair and skin. Best method for extracting carrot juice: use a fine grater and then squeeze the pulp through cheese cloth.
  • Beetroot and lemon juice – Rich in sodium food for dissolving stones in the kidneys and gall bladder.
  • Celery – Rich in calcium for strong bones and teeth.
  • Parsley and cabbage juice – Rich in manganese for memory cells and iodine for thyroid gland (youth and beauty governor)
  • Watercress and mint juice – Rich in vitamin E, the fertility vitamin. Rich in iron for red blood.
  • Lettuce or silver beet, lemon juice – Rich in sodium, the dissolver, calcium for strength and endurance.
  • Rhubarb juice – Excellent cleanser and purifier of the blood stream.
  • Grape fruit juice – Rich in iron and quinine – feeds brain and nerves, induces sleep.
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Food portion size tips

From Harvard Medical School’s Healthbeat. Look for less. Your eyes are the perfect instrument for sizing up portion sizes. Use your estimating techniques to size up the food on your plate.

  • 1 thumb tip = 1 teaspoon of peanut butter, butter, or sugar
  • 1 finger = 1 oz. of cheese
  • 1 fist = 1 cup cereal, pasta, or vegetables
  • 1 handful = 1 oz. of nuts or pretzels
  • 1 palm = 3 oz. of meat, fish, or poultry
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‘Gut Instinct: Mrs Snook’s Diet’

I am delighted to announce the launch of my new book, ‘Gut Instinct: Mrs Snook’s Diet‘ on April 12, 2017. Follow me on Facebook for updates and links to the published book.

From bustling Boston and New York of the early 1900s to a lonely Coroner’s court in rural Western Australia, ‘Gut Instinct’ tells the story of Dorothea Snook and her raw food diets for babies, children, and those suffering from various ailments, including cancer, diabetes and arthritis. Read the fascinating history of the nature cure and the remarkable people who were leading figures in the movement – advocating raw food, and alkaline diet, no dairy or meat over a century ago. Learn about the mind cure and the very modern dietary philosophies that gut microbiome science is now proving correct.

Includes interviews, case studies – plus Mrs Snook’s famous gut cleanse diet and the original vintage nature cure diet charts for a range of ailments.

Ms Snook cover small

 

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New discovery at heart of healthy cereals

A new discovery at the University of Queensland could help reduce heart disease and boost nutrition security – the access to balanced nourishment – globally.

Researchers in UQ’s Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences have identified a new mechanism for how healthy cereals such as oats reduce the amount of cholesterol in the blood stream, thereby lowering the risk of heart disease.

The discovery could lead to ways of boosting the cholesterol-fighting properties of other cereals including wheat.

UQ’s Professor Mike Gidley said the study, funded through the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Plant Cell Walls, revealed new information on the function of beta glucans – a healthy soluble fibre naturally occurring in the cell walls of some plants, particularly cereals.

Read more

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Scientists deconstruct the perfect papaya

“According to our consumer taste tests, the perfect papaya is red, small or hand-sized, fewer seeds, a velvety texture, and sweet caramelised rockmelon and banana flavours,” said Dr Heather Smyth from the Queensland Alliance of Agriculture and Food Innovation (QAAFI), a partnership between The University of Queensland (UQ) and the Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (DAF).

Despite being rich in anti-cancer components and often described as a ‘superfood’, papayas are off the menu for many consumers, due to perceptions of the fruit’s pungent taste or aroma.

“Papayas are super healthy – full of carotenoids and anti-cancer compounds such as isothiocyanates, in the flesh and seeds – but there are perceptions of them being expensive and having a bad flavour,” Dr Smyth said.

Read more

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Genetically Engineering the Chloroplast Genome

Photosynthesis – the process by which plants converted sunlight into energy for growth and produce oxygen – is arguably the most important biological process on earth. The holy grail of plant science has long been to bioengineer the photosynthetic pathways in plants to grow larger, more productive crops that are better adapted to climate change and boost food security.

LEGUME LABORATORY

We didn’t realise just how cool the chloroplast is – not only does it orchestrate photosynthesis, one of the most important phenomena sustaining life on earth, but it may play a significant role in how we feed the world sustainability.

A review in Genome Biology – ‘Chloroplast genomes: diversity, evolution and applications in genetic engineering‘ – details what we know about the chloroplast genome, how it can be used and how it can be modified, before launching into examples of why chloroplast engineering is likely to have a significant involvement in future crop engineering and in the production of pharmaceuticals and industrial materials.

The Chloroplast Genome

Our increasing knowledge of the chloroplast genome has been greatly assisted in the last decade or so by the advance in genome sequencing. Currently, the Illumina next-generation sequencing process coupled with bioinformatics tools has enabled the de-novo construction of most of the…

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Dr Alice Caporn. Alkaline diet raw food naturopath who tried to introduce wholemeal bread into Perth

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In 1939, Dr Alice Caporn was aged 65 and living in Perth. She lived for some time in the United States where she trained and developed her dietary theory.

I came across Alice Caporn while writing “Mrs Snook’s Diet”, the biography Dorothea Snook, a well-known Perth naturopath. Alice Caporn was Mrs Snook’s mentor and Mrs Snook trained in her Caporn method of exercises and followed a vintage-style diet aligned with the alkaline dietary principles of achieving the correct acid and alkaline balance in the body for optimum health.

Dr Alice Caporn, a former Coolgardie nurse, found opportunity in the United States and lived there for a number of years, where she obtained four degrees, including a Doctor of Philosophy also degrees in biology, helio-therapy and physical culture. When she returned to Australia to settle in Perth in 1938, Dr Caporn applied for a license to sell the city’s first ever loaf of wholemeal bread Perth, her linseed loaf. She sent a freshly baked loaf to the Western Australian Commissioner of Public Health, Dr Atkinson, who pointedly ignored by it (as he did Dr Caporn’s earlier letter of introduction).

On October 1, 1939, Perth’s ‘The Sunday Times’ reported:
“The efforts of local food faddist “Dr.” Alice Caporn to place a new fancy bread upon the market in Perth have failed. Alice Caporn sought permission from the Health authorities to make a kind of linseed loaf. According to the formula submitted, the bread would comprise mainly crushed linseed and wholemeal.… But after the Government Analyst (Dr. Simpson) and other authorities had considered the matter, Alice Caporn’s application to make a linseed loaf was rejected.”

Alice Caporn was outspoken on whatever issue she felt strongly about, particularly diet. In an age before computers and television, she wrote many letters to the editor an a range of subjects, from Aboriginal rights, cruelty to animals, and offered her thoughts on how men should dress appropriately for the Australian climate. She was very pro-the United States in an era when the former Australian colony’s focus was the motherland, Great Britain.

Alice M Caporn was a registered nurse, who married and went to live in the United States for a number of years. She returned, aged in her sixties, to live in Perth with relatives and ran a naturopathy practice in Nedlands. She married again when aged in her seventies.

Dr Alice Caporn was trained as a Naturopath in the early 1900s when the naturopathy profession was founded by German doctor Benedict Lust. Dr Caporn (and Mrs Snook) advocated a vegetable and juice raw food diet – no meat, dairy, limited grains. If you know anything of Dr Caporn (or Mrs Snook). I would love to hear from you. My email is margaret@margaretpuls.com.au

(Pic of Alice Caporn: The Sunday Times, Perth)

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The life of Brian (Brian Schmidt, Nobel Laureate)

I attended a talk yesterday organised by QUT Science and Engineering featuring Nobel Laureate cosmologist Brian Schmidt talking about the big bang or “gnab gib” (big bang spelled backwards), i.e. expansion and end of the universe

What a great communicator Brian Schmidt is! He gave really good advice for early career scientists. He reckons research is the best job and everything else is slightly less interesting. Professor Schmidt was born in the US, is based at ANU. I think he says in his talk that he was only 27 when he took on the role of managing the international project that led to the Nobel Prize (yes, I hate him too).

Thanks QUT and Gates Cambridge for an excellent seminar.

brian schmidt