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Plant-based diets a ‘revolution and game-changer’ – not the latest fad.

Are plant-based diets the latest fad? Not according to Steven Walton, general manager of research firm HealthFocus International, speaking at the International Food Technology conference in Last Vegas on June 28, 2017.

“I believe that plant-based eating is a game-changing trend,” Mr Walton said, claiming the dietary trend to be more of a “revolution than an evolution”.

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23 foods that contain NO calories

These 23 foods that contain NO calories because you burn more than you consume as you eat. And watch those raspberries! There’s one calorie in a raspberry.

  1. APPLES

Calorie content: 47 kcals per 100g

As the old saying goes, an apple a day keeps the doctor away – and there may be some truth to it. Apples are packed full of important vitamins such as C, and A and can promote heart health.

  1. APRICOTS

Calorie content: 12 kcals per apricot

Eating apricots is said to help reduce the risk of strokes, and heart attacks. They’re also full of vitamin C, potassium and dietary fibre, which all promote good heart health.

  1.  ASPARAGUS

Calorie content: 6 kcals per spear

As well as being packed with antioxidants, it contains lots of essential vitamins such as A, C, E and K along with plenty of fibre.

 

  1.  BEETROOT

Calorie content: 36 kcals per 100g 

Beetroot is a good source of iron and folate as well as containing plenty of antioxidants. It’s also been said to lower blood pressure, boost exercise performance and prevent dementia.

  1. BROCCOLI

Calorie content: 33 kcals per 100g

Broccoli is a great source of vitamins K and C, and also has lots of potassium and fibre. It also contains plenty of the powerful antioxidant Vitamin C which is said to help cuts heal quicker and fight off diseases such as cancers.

  1. CAULIFLOWER

Calorie content: 3 kcals per floret

One serving of cauliflower is said to contain 77 per cent of an adult’s daily recommended allowance for vitamin C. The vegetable is also a great source of other important vitamins.  

  1. CELERY

Calorie content: 2 kcals per stick

It’s mainly water which is why you’ll burn more calories than consume them when you eat this vegetable.

 

  1.  CRANBERRIES

Calorie content: 15 kcals per 100g

These red fruits are another great source of vitamin C, as well as fibre, manganese, and plenty of antioxidants.

  1. WATERCRESS

Calorie content: 4 kcals per quarter of a bunch

Watercress is thought to have medicinal properties and contains particularly high levels of vitamin K – important for bone health – and vitamin A (eye health). It also contains glucosinolate compounds, which have been found to have anti-cancer properties.

  1. CUCUMBER

Calorie content:  6 kcals per 1 inch piece

This vegetable is mostly water, and helps to flush out toxins from the body, say health experts. It also helps you stay hydrated, and contributes to both heart and eye health.

  1.  FENNEL

Calorie content: 12 kcals per 100g

As well as containing lots of fibre, it is thought that fennel helps to rebalance the female sex hormones blamed for some of the symptoms of PMT.

  1.  GARLIC

Calorie content: 49 kcals per 100g

It won’t be zero calorie if you eat too much of it, but you’ll burn off more calorie than you consume if you eat one clove, it’s said.

 

  1. GRAPEFRUIT

Calorie content: 24 kcals per half a grapefruit

A study has found that drinking grapefruit juice when eating fatty food lowers the amount of weight put on by up to a fifth.

  1. GREEN BEANS

Calorie content: 24 kcals per 100g

Eating green beans will help you get a flat stomach, according to some nutritionists. It’s packed full of essential vitamins and vitamins, as well as some protein too.

  1. KALE

Calorie content: 33 kcals per 100g

There are dozens of claims about the cancer-beating properties of kale, and while some nutritionists say eating broccoli and brussels sprouts is actually better for you, the vegetable still contains plenty of essential vitamins.

  1. LEEKS

Calorie content: 22 kcals per 100g

Leeks are an excellent source of vitamin K as well as manganese, vitamin B6, copper, iron, and vitamin C.

 

  1. LEMONS

Calorie content: 3 kcals per slice

When life gives you lemons… just eat them. A slice contains just three calories, meaning you’ll burn more or the same number – making it a zero calorie food in moderation.

  1. LETTUCE

Calorie content: 14 kcals per 100g

Made up of mostly water, a lettuce leaf won’t contribute to your daily calorie intake.

  1. ONION

Calorie content: 7 kcals in one slice

Every recipe book will contain more than a few recipes containing this staple ingredient, but in moderation, you’ll burn more calories by eating that than you consume. 

  1. RASPBERRIES

Calorie content: 1 kcal per raspberry

Raspberries contain very high levels of vitamin C, and it’s said that eating them could help to boost fertility.

  1. STRAWBERRIES

Calorie content: 3 kcals per fruit

Strawberries contain more vitamin C than the equivalent amount of oranges and have been said to aid digestion.

  1. SWEDE

Calorie content: 24 kcals per 100g

Swedes are low in calories, making them an ideal food for slimmers. They supply a reasonable amount of vitamin C – about 20 per cent of the RDA in an 85g cooked portion – as well as some beta-carotene for a healthy immune system.

  1. WATERMELON

Calorie content: 16 kcals in a quarter of a slice

It’s said this fruit could help hydrate you just as much as a glass of water can, and it’s also reported to prevent heart attacks and weight gain because it halts the build-up of bad cholesterol.

Read full article in Daily Mail Online

 

 

 

 

 

 

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New discovery at heart of healthy cereals

A new discovery at the University of Queensland could help reduce heart disease and boost nutrition security – the access to balanced nourishment – globally.

Researchers in UQ’s Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences have identified a new mechanism for how healthy cereals such as oats reduce the amount of cholesterol in the blood stream, thereby lowering the risk of heart disease.

The discovery could lead to ways of boosting the cholesterol-fighting properties of other cereals including wheat.

UQ’s Professor Mike Gidley said the study, funded through the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Plant Cell Walls, revealed new information on the function of beta glucans – a healthy soluble fibre naturally occurring in the cell walls of some plants, particularly cereals.

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Scientists deconstruct the perfect papaya

“According to our consumer taste tests, the perfect papaya is red, small or hand-sized, fewer seeds, a velvety texture, and sweet caramelised rockmelon and banana flavours,” said Dr Heather Smyth from the Queensland Alliance of Agriculture and Food Innovation (QAAFI), a partnership between The University of Queensland (UQ) and the Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (DAF).

Despite being rich in anti-cancer components and often described as a ‘superfood’, papayas are off the menu for many consumers, due to perceptions of the fruit’s pungent taste or aroma.

“Papayas are super healthy – full of carotenoids and anti-cancer compounds such as isothiocyanates, in the flesh and seeds – but there are perceptions of them being expensive and having a bad flavour,” Dr Smyth said.

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Genetically Engineering the Chloroplast Genome

Photosynthesis – the process by which plants converted sunlight into energy for growth and produce oxygen – is arguably the most important biological process on earth. The holy grail of plant science has long been to bioengineer the photosynthetic pathways in plants to grow larger, more productive crops that are better adapted to climate change and boost food security.

LEGUME LABORATORY

We didn’t realise just how cool the chloroplast is – not only does it orchestrate photosynthesis, one of the most important phenomena sustaining life on earth, but it may play a significant role in how we feed the world sustainability.

A review in Genome Biology – ‘Chloroplast genomes: diversity, evolution and applications in genetic engineering‘ – details what we know about the chloroplast genome, how it can be used and how it can be modified, before launching into examples of why chloroplast engineering is likely to have a significant involvement in future crop engineering and in the production of pharmaceuticals and industrial materials.

The Chloroplast Genome

Our increasing knowledge of the chloroplast genome has been greatly assisted in the last decade or so by the advance in genome sequencing. Currently, the Illumina next-generation sequencing process coupled with bioinformatics tools has enabled the de-novo construction of most of the…

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