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Challenge for Mediterranean diet: Young people in Mediterranean region eating more fast food

A leading advocate of the Mediterranean diet will discuss challenges for the diet’s uptake amongst millennials at the University of Queensland-hosted Global Leadership Seminar.

President of the International Foundation of the Mediterranean Diet Professor Lluis Serra-Majem will speak at the event in Brisbane in November.

“Young people in the Mediterranean region have been eating more processed, Western-style foods and meat than older generations,” said Professor Serra-Majem, also of the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria.

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How to grow new brains cells


Sandrine Thuret studies neurogenesis, or the way adult brains create new nerve cells in the hippocampus — a brain area involved in memory and mood.

Her work asks two big questions: How can we help our healthy brains create new nerve cells throughout our lives, through diet and behavior changes? And how can we study the effects of diseases such as depression and Alzheimer’s on our brains’ ability to grow?

As she explains in this TED Talk, diet is one of the ways of generating new brain cells.

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Alice Caporn’s Hollywood Juice Cocktails c.1930s

  • Carrot juice – Magnetises the blood stream, good for hair and skin. Best method for extracting carrot juice: use a fine grater and then squeeze the pulp through cheese cloth.
  • Beetroot and lemon juice – Rich in sodium food for dissolving stones in the kidneys and gall bladder.
  • Celery – Rich in calcium for strong bones and teeth.
  • Parsley and cabbage juice – Rich in manganese for memory cells and iodine for thyroid gland (youth and beauty governor)
  • Watercress and mint juice – Rich in vitamin E, the fertility vitamin. Rich in iron for red blood.
  • Lettuce or silver beet, lemon juice – Rich in sodium, the dissolver, calcium for strength and endurance.
  • Rhubarb juice – Excellent cleanser and purifier of the blood stream.
  • Grape fruit juice – Rich in iron and quinine – feeds brain and nerves, induces sleep.
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‘Gut Instinct: Mrs Snook’s Diet’

I am delighted to announce the launch of my new book, ‘Gut Instinct: Mrs Snook’s Diet‘ on April 12, 2017. Follow me on Facebook for updates and links to the published book.

From bustling Boston and New York of the early 1900s to a lonely Coroner’s court in rural Western Australia, ‘Gut Instinct’ tells the story of Dorothea Snook and her raw food diets for babies, children, and those suffering from various ailments, including cancer, diabetes and arthritis. Read the fascinating history of the nature cure and the remarkable people who were leading figures in the movement – advocating raw food, and alkaline diet, no dairy or meat over a century ago. Learn about the mind cure and the very modern dietary philosophies that gut microbiome science is now proving correct.

Includes interviews, case studies – plus Mrs Snook’s famous gut cleanse diet and the original vintage nature cure diet charts for a range of ailments.

Ms Snook cover small

 

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Dr Alice Caporn. Alkaline diet raw food naturopath who tried to introduce wholemeal bread into Perth

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In 1939, Dr Alice Caporn was aged 65 and living in Perth. She lived for some time in the United States where she trained and developed her dietary theory.

I came across Alice Caporn while writing “Mrs Snook’s Diet”, the biography Dorothea Snook, a well-known Perth naturopath. Alice Caporn was Mrs Snook’s mentor and Mrs Snook trained in her Caporn method of exercises and followed a vintage-style diet aligned with the alkaline dietary principles of achieving the correct acid and alkaline balance in the body for optimum health.

Dr Alice Caporn, a former Coolgardie nurse, found opportunity in the United States and lived there for a number of years, where she obtained four degrees, including a Doctor of Philosophy also degrees in biology, helio-therapy and physical culture. When she returned to Australia to settle in Perth in 1938, Dr Caporn applied for a license to sell the city’s first ever loaf of wholemeal bread Perth, her linseed loaf. She sent a freshly baked loaf to the Western Australian Commissioner of Public Health, Dr Atkinson, who pointedly ignored by it (as he did Dr Caporn’s earlier letter of introduction).

On October 1, 1939, Perth’s ‘The Sunday Times’ reported:
“The efforts of local food faddist “Dr.” Alice Caporn to place a new fancy bread upon the market in Perth have failed. Alice Caporn sought permission from the Health authorities to make a kind of linseed loaf. According to the formula submitted, the bread would comprise mainly crushed linseed and wholemeal.… But after the Government Analyst (Dr. Simpson) and other authorities had considered the matter, Alice Caporn’s application to make a linseed loaf was rejected.”

Alice Caporn was outspoken on whatever issue she felt strongly about, particularly diet. In an age before computers and television, she wrote many letters to the editor an a range of subjects, from Aboriginal rights, cruelty to animals, and offered her thoughts on how men should dress appropriately for the Australian climate. She was very pro-the United States in an era when the former Australian colony’s focus was the motherland, Great Britain.

Alice M Caporn was a registered nurse, who married and went to live in the United States for a number of years. She returned, aged in her sixties, to live in Perth with relatives and ran a naturopathy practice in Nedlands. She married again when aged in her seventies.

Dr Alice Caporn was trained as a Naturopath in the early 1900s when the naturopathy profession was founded by German doctor Benedict Lust. Dr Caporn (and Mrs Snook) advocated a vegetable and juice raw food diet – no meat, dairy, limited grains. If you know anything of Dr Caporn (or Mrs Snook). I would love to hear from you. My email is margaret@margaretpuls.com.au

(Pic of Alice Caporn: The Sunday Times, Perth)